whovianfeminism:

egriz:

Regeneration outtake.

(Disclaimer: I love Capaldi)

THIS IS MY FAVORITE THING.

officialssay:

The Canadian Joint Delegation to NATO tweeted some advice for Russian soldiers entering Ukraine. Moscow claims that the soldiers are mistakenly crossing over, according to NPR. 

officialssay:

The Canadian Joint Delegation to NATO tweeted some advice for Russian soldiers entering Ukraine. Moscow claims that the soldiers are mistakenly crossing over, according to NPR

archaicwonder:

Conwy Castle, Wales
Conwy Castle was built by Edward I, during his conquest of Wales, between 1283 and 1289. Constructed as part of a wider project to create the walled town of Conwy, the combined defenses cost around £15,000, a huge sum for the period. Over the next few centuries, the castle played an important part in several wars. It withstood the siege of Madog ap Llywelyn in the winter of 1294–95, acted as a temporary haven for Richard II in 1399 and was held for several months by forces loyal to Owain Glyndŵr in 1401.
Following the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1642, the castle was held by forces loyal to Charles I, holding out until 1646 when it surrendered to the Parliamentary armies. In the aftermath the castle was partially slighted by Parliament to prevent it being used in any further revolt, and was finally completely ruined in 1665 when its remaining iron and lead was stripped and sold off.

archaicwonder:

Conwy Castle, Wales

Conwy Castle was built by Edward I, during his conquest of Wales, between 1283 and 1289. Constructed as part of a wider project to create the walled town of Conwy, the combined defenses cost around £15,000, a huge sum for the period. Over the next few centuries, the castle played an important part in several wars. It withstood the siege of Madog ap Llywelyn in the winter of 1294–95, acted as a temporary haven for Richard II in 1399 and was held for several months by forces loyal to Owain Glyndŵr in 1401.

Following the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1642, the castle was held by forces loyal to Charles I, holding out until 1646 when it surrendered to the Parliamentary armies. In the aftermath the castle was partially slighted by Parliament to prevent it being used in any further revolt, and was finally completely ruined in 1665 when its remaining iron and lead was stripped and sold off.

(Source: flickr.com, via shredsandpatches)

shredsandpatches:

THEY’RE BAAAAAAAACK

(via rudennotgingr)

If a female student got drunk and had her car stolen the university would call the police. If she got drunk and had her computer stolen, they would call the police. If she got drunk and had her phone stolen, they would call the police. The fact that she was drunk would not even be factored in when assessing if a crime had been committed. But if she gets drunk and has her body invaded and her humanity stolen, school administrations are perplexed about what to do.

chsamuseum:

(Courtesy of the Helen Pon Onyett Collection, New Braunfels, TX)
#throwbackthursday! 
Helen Pon Onyett, born in August 14, 1918, served in the Army Nurse Corps after hearing about the Pearl Harbor attack. During a 1983 interview with author Judy Yung from the book Unbound Feet: A Social History of Chinese Women in San Francisco, she said that while she hated bootcamp, she found her experience in the army to be rewarding.

“‘When I spoke before audiences,’ she pointed out, ‘people gawked at me, saying, ‘Oh my God, she’s a colonel,’ not ‘She’s Oriental.’ When the general awarded her the Meritorious Service medal, one of eight major decorations for dinstinguised military service that she would receive, she added, ‘all the wives came over and said, ‘It’s about time someone recognized a woman.’”

She served for more than thirty years (1942-1978) and became the first Chinese American woman promoted to Colonel in 1971. During her service she was stationed in North Africa caring for wounded soldiers and was awarded the Legion of Merit. She passed away in Connecticut on May 18, 2005.

chsamuseum:

(Courtesy of the Helen Pon Onyett Collection, New Braunfels, TX)

#throwbackthursday! 

Helen Pon Onyett, born in August 14, 1918, served in the Army Nurse Corps after hearing about the Pearl Harbor attack. During a 1983 interview with author Judy Yung from the book Unbound Feet: A Social History of Chinese Women in San Francisco, she said that while she hated bootcamp, she found her experience in the army to be rewarding.

“‘When I spoke before audiences,’ she pointed out, ‘people gawked at me, saying, ‘Oh my God, she’s a colonel,’ not ‘She’s Oriental.’ When the general awarded her the Meritorious Service medal, one of eight major decorations for dinstinguised military service that she would receive, she added, ‘all the wives came over and said, ‘It’s about time someone recognized a woman.’”

She served for more than thirty years (1942-1978) and became the first Chinese American woman promoted to Colonel in 1971. During her service she was stationed in North Africa caring for wounded soldiers and was awarded the Legion of Merit. She passed away in Connecticut on May 18, 2005.

(via historicalagentcarter)

comedycentral:

Click here to watch Jon Stewart discuss Fox News’s coverage of Ferguson, Missouri.

comedycentral:

Click here to watch Jon Stewart discuss Fox News’s coverage of Ferguson, Missouri.

(via andrastesgrace)

uhohmarty:

Ice Covered Street Lamp on Mt Washington

uhohmarty:

Ice Covered Street Lamp on Mt Washington

(via vincecarters)

Werder Bremen headers for Twitter | credit as @frnklamprd if you use

(Source: lenomenal, via vincecarters)